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  • Link dump.

    Originally posted by WBDaddy View Post
    Your story is (or should be) a movie in your head. You imagine the characters, the scene, the action, the dialogue, the reactions, the emotional responses.

    The only way your readers can see that movie is if you describe it all to them, in vivid detail. Spare no expense describing images and facial expressions and emotions.

    Don't tell me your main character woke up (at the beginning of the story) late and ran down the stairs and out the door, tell me how she woke up to her alarm clock flashing 12:00 and threw it across the room in frustration, then scrambled through her disaster of a closet to find something to wear, then looked briefly in the mirror and bemoaned the tragic mess where her hair was supposed to be, and so on and so on…

    Don't tell me her mother stopped her as she came out of her room and said "Your grandmother is dead and we have to go to the funeral tomorrow", tell me how she was stopped dead in her tracks as she reached the living room, seeing her mother's tear-streaked eyes and the phone hanging limply from one hand as she sat on the couch, bent over, tissues littering the floor, and how her mother looked up at her and said "I'm sorry, baby. Grampa called this morning. Gramma died in her sleep last night. The funeral is on Saturday, but we're going to fly out to Topeka tomorrow for the wake."

    Don't tell me your main character started to cry, tell me how her vision clouded and her throat closed as the thought of her grandma being gone stole the strength from her body, and she collapsed next to her mother on the couch, sobbing into her chest as her mother embraced her.

    It's all about the details.

    You can write a book full of cliches, and people will eat it up if you give them all the details.
    Couldn't come up with my own proper intro, but here are some tools to help translate that movie into well crafted story for others to enjoy.

    A few notes that I have gathered for myself.
    Tropes aren't exactly a bad thing, there are only so many places you can end up when writing in this genre. The manner in which they are presented is the important thing.

    Read what you have written, then reread it, and the read it outloud to yourself. Does it sound right to you?

    Sometimes, simple is the best approach.


    Internal site links.


    There are some really good discussions in these threads, worth taking some time to at least browse over.

    Advice for new writers thread, probably super redundant to include but here it is.
    https://abdlstoryforum.info/threads/...or-New-Writers

    Story elements, this thread mostly deals with and outlines the standards ages/do's and don'ts etc...
    https://abdlstoryforum.info/threads/5955-Story-Element

    Writers block thread.
    https://abdlstoryforum.info/threads/5382-Writers-block

    Worried that you aren't getting any feedback on your writing, going through this will help alleviate some of that fear.
    https://abdlstoryforum.info/threads/...istic-question

    External site links


    What mistakes do bad writers make, and how do good writers avoid them. Lots of good tidbits in here, worth browsing over at the very least.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/c...d_how_do_good/

    Writer's-digest, name says it all.
    http://www.writersdigest.com/writing-articles

    Columbia Guide to Standard American English (linked to PDF)
    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc...=rep1&type=pdf
    ^Probably way more than anyone will ever need but it has the basics


    The Elements of Style
    http://www.bartleby.com/141/
    Asserting that one must first know the rules to break them, this classic reference book is a must-have for any student and conscientious writer.

    Cracked article, has some useful pointers here and there.
    http://www.cracked.com/personal-expe...rn-author.html

    “Adjectives in English absolutely have to be in this order: opinion-size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose Noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest you’ll sound like a maniac. It’s an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list, but almost none of us could write it out.”
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/culture/story/2...t-know-we-know

    Punctuating dialogue properly in fiction writing
    https://www.thebalance.com/punctuati...riting-1277721

    Punctuation quick reference
    http://marcomm.nd.edu/resources/styl...ick-reference/


    Credits: WBDaddy, Shygirl93, Vearynope, Cute-Kitten, Personalis84, Renko, and everyone who commented in the posts. Sorry if I forgot anyone.
    Posting comments is disabled.

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  • Link dump.
    eatenbywo1ves
    Couldn't come up with my own proper intro, but here are some tools to help translate that movie into well crafted story for others to enjoy.

    A few notes that I have gathered for myself.
    Tropes aren't exactly a bad thing, there are only so many places you can end up when writing in this genre. The manner in which they are presented is the important thing.

    Read what you have written, then reread it, and the read it outloud to yourself. Does it sound right to you?

    Sometimes, simple is the best approach.


    Internal site links.


    There are some really good discussions in these threads, worth taking some time to at least browse over.

    Advice for new writers thread, probably super redundant to include but here it is.
    https://abdlstoryforum.i...
    01-24-2017, 10:32:27 PM
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