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    #46
    Always read through your story and write down facts so you don't forget your own facts about your characters and home description or anything they own so you don't contradict yourself. Like your character has a middle name and all of a sudden they have a different middle name or they have a sliding door and all of a sudden they don't have a sliding door.

    And please paragraphs and every time the character speaks, make a new line each time.

    Don't rush your story, take your time. There is no competition for who can get their next chapter posted and there being a prize and there is no dead line for when your next chapter shall be posted.
    It's easier to use a toilet than a diaper.... Those things are high maintenance. Gotta change, take care of the skin, insure proper hydration so you don't stink

    Nope. Those who go 24/7 aren't lazy at all. It's lazier to be a toilet slave! Hah!!

    user on Dailydiapers

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      #47
      Originally posted by Kita Sparkles View Post
      Re: Advice For New Writers

      It is extremely common when you are reading stories as they are written that the author runs out of ideas, or ends up hitting a busy time in his/her life. Life has to come first. Those are things that need to be done. Many times the author intends to come back to it … and sometimes we do, even after years. I have one myself that I intend to write - started on it over 5 years ago.

      I lose interest in writing when I get lack of responses. Getting lot of views and barely any replies tells me people are not interested in my work so I lose motivation which is why I don't post my work online anymore on public forums. So that could be another reason why someone may quit updating their story. It's always good to send them a PM if they are still around and ask them about their story. It lets them know someone is still enjoying it and they might be motivated to continue it.
      It's easier to use a toilet than a diaper.... Those things are high maintenance. Gotta change, take care of the skin, insure proper hydration so you don't stink

      Nope. Those who go 24/7 aren't lazy at all. It's lazier to be a toilet slave! Hah!!

      user on Dailydiapers

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by Spokane Girl View Post


        I lose interest in writing when I get lack of responses. Getting lot of views and barely any replies tells me people are not interested in my work so I lose motivation which is why I don't post my work online anymore on public forums. So that could be another reason why someone may quit updating their story. It's always good to send them a PM if they are still around and ask them about their story. It lets them know someone is still enjoying it and they might be motivated to continue it.
        Actually, it usually means the exact opposite, at least on here. Remember, search engines don't count in the views count here. Those are actual humans viewing the stories, and a lot of them are people who either don't have accounts or don't log in to comment.

        This story by bbykimmy is a good example. At the time I'm writing this there are 2,155 views on it, of those 1,492 are people either without accounts or who were simply not logged in at the time.

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          #49
          WB Daddy did an awesome guide on the technical aspects of dialogue since someone on DD asked him to. https://www.dailydiapers.com/board/i...omment-1612842
          Please consider supporting me on patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Cute_Kitten

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            #50

            Writing Dialogue

            Some people struggle to write dialogue, and for very good reason: This is hard!

            Consider the following story snippet:
            Hi / Heya
            How are you / I'm in diapers

            There's nothing to say that this is conversation, so let's follow standard convention with quotes and paragraphs. (I'm avoiding line breaks between paragraphs to minimise space use)
            "Hi"
            "Heya"
            "How are you"
            "I'm in diapers"
            We can now read things more easily, but if this conversation went on for even a couple more sentences it would become hard to track the speakers. Let's add them in, along with the necessary punctuation.
            "Hi!" said Mary.
            "Heya," said Sam.
            "How are you?" said Mary,
            "I'm in diapers," said Sam.

            We now know who is speaking but this is worse than before! This is like a court transcript, not a conversation. We need to give Mary and Sam some life, a bit of variety, introduce all of the other things in the conversation.
            "Hi!" said Mary.
            "Heya," replied Sam, looking uncomfortable.
            "How are you?" Mary inquired.
            "I'm in diapers," admitted Sam sadly.
            Mary stopped and looked at Sam in surprise.

            Just throwing in different words instead of 'said' livens things, adding in a few visual and stated emotions changes the nature of the conversation, a pause and look at the end adding new information with no words. We can go further though: Instead of steaming straight into diapers we have real people with an existing relationship, with social dynamics at play. The conversation would be both more complex and also less formal.
            "Hi Babes!" said Mary brightly.
            "Heya," replied Sam, looking uncomfortable.
            Mary cocked her head, looked at Sam. "Are you ok?"
            "Yeah," said Sam unconvincingly, "I'm.."
            "Oh sweetie. What is it?" asked Mary, "It's not like you to have secrets."
            Sam looked up at Mary and sighed. She hesitated before confirming, "You know I went to the doctor yesterday?"
            Mary nodded, her brow furrowed in concern.
            Sam seemed to reach a decision and told Mary, "Well, look." Lifting her top above her waist, Sam pulled the waistband of her skirt out a little at the side, revealing what was underneath.
            Mary found herself inadvertently stuttering in surprise. "Is that..?"
            Sam released her skirt and top, hiding the plastic underneath. "Yes," she admitted, "Oh Mary, it's terrible!"

            Now we have a conversation. Better yet, the topic of the conversation has been shared and explored, and never actually stated. Which is how conversations often happen. In a snippet like this it's hard to know whether more is needed, but we haven't mentioned the environment, the context or the weather. Just adding a few details turns the dialogue into a story.
            As Mary came into the office she spotted her best friend, Sam, sat in the kitchen area, and walked straight over. "Hi Babes!" said Mary brightly.

            Sam looked up from her coffee, cradling it in her hands. "Heya," she replied, looking uncomfortable.

            Immediately sensing something was wrong Mary cocked her head, looked at Sam. "Are you ok?"

            Sam almost winced, and put the coffee onto the table beside her. "Yeah," she said unconvincingly, "I'm.."

            "Oh sweetie. What is it?" asked Mary, "It's not like you to have secrets."

            Sam looked up at Mary and sighed. They'd been friends for a long time, and going into business together had strengthened the bond and trust between them. Even so she hesitated before confirming, "You know I went to the doctor yesterday?"

            Mary nodded, her brow furrowed in concern.

            Sam seemed to reach a decision and told Mary, "Well, look." Lifting her top above her waist, Sam pulled the waistband of her skirt out a little at the side, revealing what was underneath.

            Mary found herself inadvertently stuttering in surprise. "Is that..?" She tried to look back at Sam's face but couldn't draw her eyes away, a mix of intrigue and horror compelling her gaze.

            Sam released her skirt and top, hiding the plastic underneath. "Yes," she admitted, "Oh Mary, it's terrible!"


            So as I said, it's hard. This is why so many of my stories have minimal or no dialogue at all. But bad as my closing example is, it's still improved a little from the start point.

            In short, don't write dialogue. Write a conversation. Add context, environment, emotion, facial expressions, body language, movements, actions and reactions. Blend all of these things to create a story, whether the conversation is advancing a major plot element, providing the reader with background and context, fleshing out the characters or fulfilling another purpose. It's not a dialogue, it's part of your story.

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              #51
              Some added notes about “said”:

              It’s better to put names and pronouns before “said.” It’s better to say “he said” than “said he.” Same with “Bob said” instead of “said Bob.” Both orders are correct but people don’t put said first in everyday speech anymore so it feels less natural and stands out. This relates to my second point.

              English speakers are so used to reading “said” that it doesn’t register when reading it as part of a narrative. A lot of new writers try to avoid writing “said” like the plague because of a belief that it’s too dull or robotic, leading them to flood their stories with colorful dialogue tags when in most cases the conversation would flow better with "said" or no tags at all. There is no penalty for writing “said,” it’s a neutral word. You use it when the dialogue speaks for itself, you’d avoid it when the speaker’s tone differs from how the reader would expect them to sound based on the dialogue (e.g. sarcasm, detachment, awkward laughter, suppressed rage).
              Last edited by TheOneWhoSees; 11-07-2019, 03:02:39 AM.
              Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

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                #52
                If you want to make life easier for yourself, make full use of the auto replace feature in word. Let's say that you have to write a long word, like thisisnonsenseimwritingdotcom (this is nonsense I'm writing dot com) but you want to have word write it for you. Then you can make use of the auto replace feature, so you can type something you aren't likely to use, like fpt which is then automatically replaced by thisis....

                I abuse this to replace i with I, i'm with I'm and there are so many other examples. auto replace names for your characters, so they're always written with a capital letter. If you tend to make the same mistakes (daiper instead of diaper) then you can auto replace daiper with diaper.

                Oh! What's also very important is that you should try to show instead of telling. That basically boils down to having your characters show you the things in your story instead of writing paragraphs, 'telling' the reader what's going on.

                Personally, I try to stick to five lines per paragraph. Whenever I have a line of dialogue, I have a white space immediately after. So for example,

                "I'm telling you this, just, so I can showcase how bloody awesome I am!" The character who won't be showing up again declared arrogantly.

                and here I will then continue the next paragraph....

                See?

                What is also important is that you should try and avoid the contant 'character said' over and over again. Try and use words to say HOW the character says it and what they're feeling. Do they say it calmly? are they angry? are they saying it sadly? Are they barely restraining their anger? Do they say this sentence. with. A. Pause. In. Between? as to underline how they are feeling?

                However, you should also make sure that the variations you're using FIT! For example, if your characters are discussing something, or they're just talking about something, using 'character argued' to use a counter isn't right. I've been writing stories since I was fourteen (give or take) and I'm now 33. Also, for those of you who aren't English speakers first and foremost, don't assume that just because the words SOUND alike, that they're right. For example, you have color/colour, armor/armour/ and so many others right? (brish / us spelling?)

                But then you have words like heart / hearth that sound the same but are NOT! It's only because someone was kind enough to point this out to me, that I'm no longer making that mistake. Although, I would like to think I would have figured it out eventually.

                Finally, and this is a personal gripe, I just can't over with. Do. Not. Write. AnywayS or thru. Neither are appropriate in stories. You want to use it in replies on a forum? Fine, go ahead. But those two do not have a place in a story. Anyways is very informal and thru isn't correct grammar. I googled it and I double-checked my sources a while ago.

                Oh! and one more thing. Don't be afraid to double check if you're writing a fanfiction or anything. Nothing is more irritable then having an author write kage bushin instead of bunshin or shushin instead of shunshin. this refers to the naruto anime. Do. Your. Research. People! Double and sometimes TRIPPLE check your sources.

                Kingdark

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                  #53
                  Attributions: only necessary when it's unclear who is speaking!!! And you are so right about letting the dialogue show how the person is feeling, with maybe some physical gestures thrown in for color. All these things have much more impact than digging through a thesaurus to find a unique way to say "said".

                  Also, informal speech is perfectly acceptable inside quotes (people don't talk in perfect English), but badly spelled words have no place in a story unless you're literally conveying the contents of some sort of electronic text communication, in which case anything goes.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Originally posted by WBDaddy View Post
                    Attributions: only necessary when it's unclear who is speaking!!! And you are so right about letting the dialogue show how the person is feeling, with maybe some physical gestures thrown in for color. All these things have much more impact than digging through a thesaurus to find a unique way to say "said".

                    Also, informal speech is perfectly acceptable inside quotes (people don't talk in perfect English), but badly spelled words have no place in a story unless you're literally conveying the contents of some sort of electronic text communication, in which case anything goes.

                    Exactly! I'm not saying that there aren't any situations where anyways and thru won't ever come up. It's just that in most situations, it really doesn't come up. Unless slang is involved maybe? I mean, when I chat with friends, I don't write proper Dutch either. I don't even think about it. But for English, which is my second language, I do.

                    Oh! If you want to avoid using the same word over and over gain, check for synonymons.(plural?) Be careful though, because sometimes, the options shown aren't appropriate to use.

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